Explore the Collection

 

Freight Equipment

Alot of freight equipment is in the collection mostly from the local area, but also some unusual gems.


Caledonia, Mississippi and Western Railroad Boxcar No. 321

The Caledonia, Mississippi and Western Railroad Boxcar No. 321 is probably the oldest boxcar in the state of Minnesota. Its ancestry has been traced to 1879, and thus would share geriatric honors with the St. Paul and Pacific boxcar that is part of the WILLIAM CROOKS train display. It operated between Reno, Minnesota on the Mississippi River to Preston via Caledonia, a distance of 57.7 miles. The line was acquired by the Milwaukee Railroad in 1880 and converted to standard gauge in 1901. The narrow gauge car was then transferred to the Wabasha, Zumbrota lines, which were also acquired by the Milwaukee. The boxcar was retired from railroad service in 1903 when the Wabasha narrow gauge line was converted to standard gauge.

 

Duluth and Iron Range Boxcar No. 5132

Constructed by the Duluth and Iron Range at Two Harbors in 1885, this 30-ton capacity car represents an excellent example of the car builder’s art in the 1880s. Donated to the Museum by the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway, this car was restored by members of the Lake Superior Transportation Club.

 

Burlington Northern
Bopper No. 800004

Generally, a freight car hauls goods one way and comes back empty. In an effort to make the most out of their railcars, Burlington Northern experimented with boppers, or boxhopper cars, that could carry both boxcar freight and hopper car freight. These aluminum cars were equipped with movable "walking" floors that were meant to shake hopper goods into discharge chutes. The floors were hydraulically powered by a generator located in a power car. In the end, the boppers didn't work out for the BN. Though some were scrapped, Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad donated three boppers and a power car to the museum in March 2002. Please check back for historical information. Photo by M.C. Fair

 

Duluth and Iron Range
Gondola Car No. 6105

This car is typical of those used for transporting such commodities as coal, sand, and heavy machinery. No. 6105 was constructed in 1907 by Western Steel and Foundry Company. The car was completely reconstructed by the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range for donation to the Museum.

 

Duluth, Missabe and Northern
Flat Car No. 2124

Built by Barney and Smith in 1893, No. 2124 was one of the original pieces of rolling stock acquired by the DM&N. In the early years, it saw service hauling white pine logs to the big sawmills at Duluth. This car was completely restored by the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway for donation to the Museum.

 

Duluth, Missabe and Northern
Ore Car No. 849 

Built in 1907, DM&N Ore Car No. 849 is representative of the first all-steel ore cars placed in service on the Mesabi Range. With a capacity of 50 tons, it represented a giant stride beyond the 25-ton capacity wooden cars that it replaced. Today’s ore cars are of 75- to 100-ton capacity. The car itself weighs 16.1 tons, and was repainted by the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway for donation to the Museum. Photo from Lake Superior Railroad Museum collection

 

Northern Pacific
Stock Car No. 83099 

This car was built in the Northern Pacific's Como Shops in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1931 or 1932. Used to haul livestock, No. 83099 has a wooden superstructure with steel under frame and has a capacity of 80,000 pounds. Photo by Bruce Ojard

 

Duluth and Iron Range
Boxcar No. 5124  

Constructed by the Duluth and Iron Range at Two Harbors in 1885, this 30-ton capacity car represents an excellent example of the car builder’s art in the 1880s. Donated to the Museum by the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway, this car was restored by members of the Lake Superior Transportation Club.

 

Burlington Northern
Bopper No. 800001  

Generally, a freight car hauls goods one way and comes back empty. In an effort to make the most out of their railcars, Burlington Northern experimented with boppers, or boxhopper cars, that could carry both boxcar freight and hopper car freight. These aluminum cars were equipped with movable "walking" floors that were meant to shake hopper goods into discharge chutes. The floors were hydraulically powered by a generator located in a power car. In the end, the boppers didn't work out for the BN. Though some were scrapped, Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad donated three boppers and a power car to the museum in March 2002. Please check back for historical information. Photo by M.C. Fair

Burlington Northern
Bopper Power Car No. 800009 

Generally, a freight car hauls goods one way and comes back empty. In an effort to make the most out of their railcars, Burlington Northern experimented with boppers, or boxhopper cars, that could carry both boxcar freight and hopper car freight. These aluminum cars were equipped with movable "walking" floors that were meant to shake hopper goods into discharge chutes. The floors were hydraulically powered by a generator located in a power car. In the end, the boppers didn't work out for the BN. Though some were scrapped, Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad donated three boppers and a power car to the museum in March 2002. Please check back for historical information. Photo by M.C. Fair

Duluth and Iron Range
Refrigerator Car No. 7128

Refrigerator cars were originally used on the D&IR to transport potatoes and other produce. No. 7128, which was built in 1906, was later assigned to LCL (less than carload) service and retired upon cessation of this service in the 1960s. The car, which may be the last of its kind, was donated to the Museum by the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range and was restored by members of the Lake Superior Transportation Club. This car was ice-cooled, while all of today’s refrigerator cars have mechanical cooling systems.Photo by Bruce Ojard.

Northern Pacific
Flat Car No. 100 

This logging skeleton car came to the museum with the Minnetonka. Our file contains no historic information. If you have any information on this car, please contact us at museum@lsrm.org. Photo by Hannah Booth.

 

 

Quincy and Torch Lake Rock Car No. 54

The Quincy and Torch Lake Rock Car No. 54 was used in copper mining service near Hancock, Michigan. Built in 1900 primarily of wood, it carried copper-bearing crude ore from the Quincy Mine to the concentrator. It carried 20 tons of crude ore on a three-foot narrow gauge track. It is typical of the early wooden ore cars used in the early years of the mining industry of Northern Minnesota. The car was donated to the Museum by the Quincy Mining Company in 1979.  Photos by Hannah Booth.