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Chicago and North Western
Parlor/Lounge No. 6700

C&NW 6700, formerly 6700, the Deerpath, formerly 6511, was built in 1946 for the Twin Cities 400 by Pullman Standard. It was configured as a 1 drawing room, 22 seat parlor car. In 1961 the car was modified with the removal of the drawing room and the adjacent smoking lounge. At this time the car's conventional 32-volt power system was also removed and replaced with a 480-volt system that was compatible with the C&NW bi-level commuter equipment. From then until retirement it served as a club lounge on Chicago commuter trains. In storage at Escanaba and Lake Superior Railroad

Coach No. 33

33.jpg (24061 bytes)This coach was constructed in 1918 by Pullman Car Company for the Duluth & Iron Range Railroad. It is referred to as a heavy weight passenger coach. This particular coach was used extensively in the region on the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway’s passenger service between Hibbing and Ely/Winton, Minnesota. This coach was used in the filming of the Walt Disney movie Iron Will, and is part of the collection of the Lake Superior Railroad Museum.

Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range
Railway Coach Minnesota II

Minnesota II was built in 1946 by Pullman for the Northern Pacific Railroad. Numbered 517, it served on both The Mainstreeter and The North Coast Limited. At 85-feet long, it seats 62 passengers and features a smoking lounge (which is, of course, smoke free today). It was sold to the DM&IR by Burlington Northern around 1974, and was the only piece of non-self-propelled STREAMLINE passenger equipment owned by the DM&IR. Minnesota II was officially donated to the museum by the DM&IR in August 2000 and is used on the North Shore Scenic Railroad.

Northern Pacific Railway
Post Office Car No. 1447

RPO Car No. 1447 was built for the Northern Pacific in 1914. It consists of a fully equipped 30-foot mail compartment and a 40-foot baggage section. There are large side doors in each section to facilitate loading and unloading. However, the only way to get from the mail section to the baggage section and back when the train was moving was through a trap door under the counter. Because the postal workers were kept very busy, it probably wasn’t used very often. Most of the letters at that time were carried by train, instead of by truck or air as they are today. The worker would stand at the counter canceling stamps, using the rubber pads on the counter to hold the letters. Next, he would place the mail in the proper pigeonhole for its destination. The pigeonholes were labeled with the names of the towns that the train traveled through. When they were full, the postal worker would put the letters into canvas bags which, when full, were tied at the top and put in the back until delivery. The cubicles above the canvas bags were probably used for things like bulk mail and newspapers. This mail would be tossed over the top of the doors. When they were full, a canvas bag was hung on hooks underneath, and the door was slid open. This allowed everything to slide out, due to the slanted bottom. Wooden sorting tables placed in front of the canvas mailbags were also used when separating the mail.

On the side door of the mail section, there is a large black hook. This is for picking up mail “on the fly.” If there were no passengers to pick up, rpo.jpg (8934 bytes)but the mail still needed to be picked up, the stationmaster would hook a canvas mailbag to a tall pole with side arms. As the train went by, the worker in the RPO pulled the hook to a horizontal position and caught the mailbag, lowering it into the car. Delivering mail from a moving car was a bit easier. The postal worker would set the mailbag on the floor, and when the train passed the station, he opened the gate and kicked the bag onto the station platform. The stationmaster then came out to retrieve it.

The baggage compartment has been converted into a railway historical library and archive, which is open for research by special arrangement. RPO cars were once quite common in the railroad industry, but now are extremely rare. The car was donated to the Museum by the Burlington Northern, and restored by the Lake Superior Transportation Club.

Northern Pacific
Observation Car 390 Rainier Club

This car was built in 1946 by Pullman and spent its entire career on the Northern Pacific's North Coast Limited. In the later 1960s it was retired from active service and placed in storage. At that point, Carroll Mattlin of White Bear Lake, MN purchased the car. The museum purchased the Rainier Club in 1984 from Mr. Mattlin and restored it to operating condition. It was in storage at the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway's Proctor Roundhouse for years until it was brought back to the LSRM in 2003.  Photo from Lake Superior Railroad Museum collection

 

Great Northern Coach 1115

Great Northern Coach 1115 was built in 1950 by American Car and Foundry for the Great Northern Railway’s “Internationals,” which carried passengers between Seattle, Washington and Vancouver, British Columbia. The coach is now part of the collection of the Lake Superior Railroad Museum.

Great Northern Coach 1116

Great Northern Coach 1116 was built in 1950 by American Car and Foundry for the Great Northern Railway’s “Internationals,” which carried passengers between Seattle, Washington and Vancouver, British Columbia. The coach is now part of the collection of the Lake Superior Railroad Museum.

Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway
Business Car Missabe

Car Missabe was built in 1893 by the Ohio Falls Car Company. It was purchased for the Duluth, Missabe and Northern Railway by the Merritt brothers, the developers of the Mesabi Iron Range. It was used by the railroad from 1893 until 1931. The car was then sold to Foley Brothers Construction and used as an office at the Boulder Dam construction site. In 1937 the car was sold to George T. Maloy of St. Paul, an executive with Foley Brothers, who moved it to a lot on the St. Croix River in Hudson, Wisconsin for use as a summer home. It served three generations of Maloys for summer vacations. Upon the death of James G. Maloy (George Maloy's only son) in 1997, his wife, Catherine Maloy, donated Car Missabe to the Lake Superior Railroad Museum.

The interior of the car is largely original and intact. The restoration work on this car took nearly 15 years to complete the exterior, with careful attention to detail to make everything as "original" as possible. Even though the car body is wood, the car itself, not including the trucks (wheels), weighs 35 tons. The car would have cost about $4,500.00 when new. It did not originally have electric lights. These were retrofitted sometime between 1906 and 1910. The car is now on display in the Railroad Museum.
Photo by Mike Oswald

Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway
Business Car Northland

Built by the Pullman Company of Chicago in 1916, car Northland was the last of the Duluth, Missabe and Northern Railway’s business cars. Ordered by then-DM&N President William A. McGonagle, the Northland replaced Business Car Missabe, which is currently being restored in the museum’s Lenard Draper Maintenance Shop. The coach is of all-steel construction, including the interior bulkheads, which have been grained to look like rich mahogany. The Northland measures 82 feet in length and weighs roughly 100 tons. It is essentially the same today as when it was first put into service, though a few modifications have been made. Roller bearing journals were added in 1949, ice-activated air conditioning and a propane generator were installed in 1950 and a propane-fired hot water boiler was installed in 1988. Numerous improvements have been made to the original 32-volt DC electrical system. Car Northland was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

The Northland has seen continuous service since its construction and has hosted numerous notable passengers, including King Olaf of Norway and President Calvin Coolidge. It was used as James J. Hill’s private car in the Walt Disney film Iron Will, which was filmed in and around Duluth in 1991-1992.

The museum purchased Business Car Northland and its companion work car W-24 from the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway in the summer of 2003. We are pleased to be able to keep the Northland in the Northland. Photo by Basgen, LSRM Collection

Duluth and Iron Range
Coach No.19

Constructed by the famous Ohio car builders, Barney and Smith, Coach No. 19 was built for the D&IR in 1907. Originally a 67-seat coach, it was rebuilt into a gas motor car (running on its own, with no locomotive) in 1926. Used on the cross-range run between Allen Junction and Virginia, its engines malfunctioned with such annoying regularity that it was soon reconverted to a coach. After a number of years, No. 19 was turned into a work car and painted gray inside and out. In this guise, it carried men and equipment to different parts of the track to do track repair work. The coach was donated by the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway Company in 1974. Members of the Lake Superior Transportation Club restored No. 19. They removed all of the remaining seats along with the gray work paint. Though probably not a first class car, No. 19 was rather fancy. The ceiling had painted pinstriping, which disappeared along with the work paint. The car is used to house photos pertaining to the Missabe Road and its predecessors, the D&IR and the Duluth, Missabe and Northern.

Duluth, Missabe and Northern
Coach No. 68 NARBW China Exhibit Car

This passenger coach is the last remaining of the 4 ordered by the DM & N Ry. in 1908, and one of the last wooden coaches manufactured by American Car and Foundry before the advent of the all-steel car. Orignially Car 68 and later renumbered 114, it was donated to the Museum in 1982 by the DM & IR Ry. Company. It has been restored for the Museum by the Twin Ports Chapter of the National Association of Railway Business Women as an exhibit car for the NARBW Collection of Dining Car China and Silver. Restoration work has been done by members of the Chapter and DM & IR Veterans, with help from Transportation Club members and friends. This car and its exhibits were dedicated and accepted by the Museum on May 11, 1989.Photos by Tim Schandel

Great Northern
Dining Car No. 1250 - Lake of the Isles

Lake of the Isles Dining Car - Number 1250 - Great Northern The Lake of the Isles was constructed by American Car and Foundry in 1951 for use on the passenger train the Empire Builder, which operated daily between Chicago and Seattle. It seats 44 passengers and is equipped with complete kitchen facilities. Etched glass partitions in the diner depict local scenes of mining and lake shipping operations, two important industries served by the Great Northern Railway. The Lake of the Isles was donated to the Lake Superior Railroad Museum in 1976 by Burlington Northern. It is available for charter on the North Shore Scenic Railroad. Photo by Tim Schandel

Spokane, Portland and Seattle
Baggage Car No. 66

66.jpg (6441 bytes)Built in 1923 by the Pullman Company, Baggage Car No. 66 was originally built as a sleeping car. It was modified between 1948 and 1949 to a baggage car, and is painted Spokane, Portland and Seattle.Today it is part of the Lake Superior Railroad Museum and is used on the North Shore Scenic Railroad as a concession car.

St. Paul and Pacific
Coach No. 3:

Built by the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad in 1882, this car was received by the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba the same year. It was renovated by the Great Northern Railway in 1924 to typify equipment in service on the St. Paul and Pacific during the 1860s for display with the locomotive WILLIAM CROOKS. One of the first passenger cars on the SP&P, this 53-foot passenger coach has a capacity of 50 riders. While the car is the same vintage as the Passenger/Baggage No. 1, it does have several unique features. Note that this car has wooden window shades. There is also a clerestory roof, meaning the center section is raised above the sides, a trait common to passenger cars until the coming of streamliners in the 40s. The car also features fancy cast baggage racks and silver-colored ventilators.There is a coal stove on each end of the car for heat, and candles were used for lighting. During cold weather, this design made it too hot for those nearest the stoves and too cold for those near the middle. The seats are leather-covered horsehair padding, and the car is all wood with some iron reinforcing. Note the truss rods under the car. These are common to most cars that are of wood construction and provide much of the support to keep the body straight. Both St. Paul and Pacific Coaches have traveled extensively to fairs in New York and Chicago and on war bond promotion excursions during World War II. Coach No. 3 was donated to the Minnesota Historical Society by the Great Northern Railway, and is on custodial loan to the Museum. Item on indefinite custodial loan from Minnesota Historical Society. Photo by Bruce Ojard

St. Paul and Pacific
Passenger Car No. 1


SP&P Car No. 1 was built by Haskell and Barker in 1882 for the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba. One of the first passenger cars on the St. Paul and Pacific, the No. 1 is actually a coach/baggage combine. A little over half of the car length is a baggage area, with a capacity of 20,000 pounds, and the rest has coach seats (18). This car is typical of the coach building style of the era: all wood construction with iron reinforcement. Note that the even part of the truck frames is made with wood timbers. Heat in the car was provided by two coal stoves, and candles were used for lighting. Cooling came only from open windows and ventilators in the roof, a method that allowed a great deal of dust to enter the car. The dirt, smoke, moisture, and cinders were the bane of travelers during hot weather. The seats are simple metal frames and the cushions are horsehair padding covered in leather. Note that this car has a simple arched roof. The compartment under the car carried tools. This car was equipped with hand brakes shaped like steering wheels at each end.
When the SP&P became the Great Northern Railway, they selected the mountain goat as their symbol. As time passed, the GN became Burlington Northern, and they didn’t use the goat anymore. They donated 2 taxidermy-preserved mountain goats to the Museum, which we placed in Car No. 1. Now when visitors peek through the window, they can see the goats and remember that this car once belonged to the Great Northern.
The car was renovated by the Great Northern Railway in 1924, in keeping with equipment on the SP&P during the 1860s, for display with the locomotive William Crooks. It was donated to the Minnesota Historical Society by the Great Northern Railway, and is on custodial loan to the Museum. Item on indefinite custodial loan from Minnesota Historical Society. Photo by Bruce Ojard

Burlington Northern
Passenger Express Boxcar No. 950535 MWT

This passenger express boxcar was built by Great Northern Railway as their No. 2628 in 1952. It has a capacity of 50 tons and weighs 34.5 tons. It was donated to the museum in 1988 by the Burlington Northern Railroad Company.In storage at Rice's Point

 

Lake Superior Museum of Transportation
No. 1000: The Power Car

Former Canadian Nati onal Baggage Car No. 9299 was built in 1957 by National Steel Car Company, Ltd. It was later used by Canadian passenger service VIA Rail. Today it is painted Lake Superior Museum of Transportation No. 1000, former name of the Lake Superior Railroad Museum, and is operated on the Museum’s excursion line, the North Shore Scenic Railroad.





Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range
Combination Car W24

W24 Combine CarAmerican Car & Foundry built this car as 79 -­seat coach No. 24 for the Duluth & Iron Range Railroad in 1912. In 1934, it was converted to accompany business car Northland, to allow for more baggage and seating capacity. Sliding baggage doors were installed and half of the windows were covered over. Renumbered W-24, it could seat 40 people. The car became the property of the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway in 1938 when the Duluth, Missabe & Northern merged with the Duluth & Iron Range. In 1947 the car was remodeled again, adding two enclosed sleeping compartments that replaced coach seats. Another compartment was added in 1948. Today it can seat 24 passengers with sleeping space for six. The W-24 and car Northland were purchased by the Lake Superior Railroad Museum from the DM&IR in July 2003. The car is operational and used frequently on North Shore Scenic Railroad trains.


Northern Pacific
Baggage Car No. 255 (Gallery Car)

This car is currently on display in the Railroad Museum with rotating exhibits annually


Photos of the Car Messabe (info above)
before its restoration.

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Business Car Missabe as it looked when donated in 1998.

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Car Missabe on its way to the LSRM.


Car Missabe undergoing roof work in the museum's Lenard Draper Maintenance Building.

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Volunteer Lee Oviatt readying the roof for transport.

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Business Car Missabe as it looked when donated in 1998.

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Car Missabe on its way to the LSRM.


Car Missabe undergoing roof work in the museum's Lenard Draper Maintenance Building.

missabe3.jpg (16126 bytes)
Volunteer Lee Oviatt readying the roof for transport.